Home Care

Home Instruction

Mark D. Zeigler DMD

Patient Home Care After Oral Surgery

Healing: Do not disturb the wound by touching it with fingers, toothpick, or mark-and-child
tongue. Irritation, bleeding and infection could result. The blood clot, which forms over the area, should not be disturbed.

Bleeding: Immediately after extraction bite hard and steadily on a piece of gauze to exert pressure on the area for at least 30 minutes to 1 hour (changing gauze every 5-10 minutes or when needed). Remove gauze after 1 hour, if bleeding continues, place another piece of rolled gauze or a wet tea bag over extraction area and continue to bite hard and steadily for another 15 minutes to ½ hour. Some slight oozing of blood from extraction site is not unusual for first few hours.

Do not rinse mouth with water. It is important not to rinse clot out of the extraction site. If you have any doubt about clot holding, call for us to see you.

Rinsing: No rinsing on the day of surgery, but the day after surgery you should rinse with a warm salt water solution 3 times per day for 5 days. 1 teaspoon salt in 8 oz. warm (not hot) water.

Rinse gently so as to avoid disturbing the blood clot. Rinsing helps relieve soreness and flushes away food particles from the extraction site.

Patient Home Care Instructions Following Crown or Bridge Appointment

If you have had Novocaine, please be careful not to bite your tongue or the inside of your cheeks. Avoid eating chewy foods until the numbness has worn off.

It is important that the temporary crown (or bridge) stay in place until the permanent crown is inserted. If the temporary crown becomes dislodged or feels uncomfortable, please call us so that we may see you as soon as possible. Do not attempt to “glue” the temporary crown back in yourself or “go without it” as the teeth may become sensitive or shift slightly preventing insertion of the permanent crown.

Avoid chewing anything very hard or sticky on the temporary crown. Examples to avoid:

  • Crusty, hard breads
  • Sticky or hard candy
  • Gum

To prevent pulling temporary crown off, avoid flossing, but do brush carefully and thoroughly. It is important to brush and keep gum tissue as clean as possible.

Remember, we are happy to see you to check the temporary crown if you have a question prior to insertion of the permanent crown.

Post Operative Instructions for Periodontal Scaling and Root Planning

If you are having root planning, it is the first step in the treatment and prevention of periodontalbrushesincup disease. You can use warm salt-water rinses alternating with peroxide rinses (Peroxyl) to give relief from any soreness and to help keep the area clean and free of any loose debris. Anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen (Advil, Aleve and Motrin) are excellent, as is Tylenol for relief of mild discomfort.

The success of your treatment depends on keeping a schedule of frequent cleaning appointments and maintaining your home care during and after your root planning procedure.

We will check the health of your tissues by reprobing the pocket depths after your root planning. We will then put you on a three-month recall to prevent the recurrence of periodontal disease.

If you are having root planning, it is the first step in the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease.

You can use warm salt-water rinses alternating with peroxide rinses (Peroxyl) to give relief from any soreness and to help keep the area clean and free of any loose debris.

Anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen (Advil, Aleve and Motrin) are excellent, as is Tylenol for relief of mild discomfort.

The success of your treatment depends on keeping a schedule of frequent cleaning appointments and maintaining your home care during and after your root planning procedure.

We will check the health of your tissues by reprobing the pocket depths after your root planning. We will then put you on a three-month recall to prevent the reocurrence of periodontal disease.

Home Instructions for Denture Care

Dentures today are made from very advanced materials designed to give you a natural appearance.

However, keep in mind that just like your teeth, dentures should be cared for with the same diligence. This means daily brushing and regular visits to your dentist.

Regular visits to your dentist are critical. Your dentist also can make minor adjustments that ensure that your dentures continue fitting naturally and comfortably.

Just like natural teeth, dentures need to be cleansed of plaque, food particles, and other debris. Keeping your dentures in top shape will also keep the soft tissues of your mouth healthy; an unclean or malformed denture can cause infections and irritation.

Cleaning Techniques

Remember to rinse and brush your dentures after every meal, and soak them in denture solution overnight. This also allows your gums to breathe while you sleep.

Simple techniques for keeping your dentures clean:

Remember to use a separate toothbrush to clean your own natural teeth, as well as all of your gum tissues. In lieu of a toothbrush, a soft washcloth may be used to wipe your gums.

Over time, even daily care of your dentures may require them to be cleaned by the dentist. A powerful ultrasonic cleaner may be used to remove hard accumulations of tartar and other substances.

Managing Pain

There are many methods for relieving oral pain.pain-managment

  • Ice packs on the affected area
  • Avoiding hard candy or ice
  • Avoiding sleeping on your stomach

Emergency Care

A knocked out tooth or bitten tongue can cause panic in any parent, but quick thinking and staying calm are the best ways to approach such common dental emergencies and prevent additional unnecessary damage and costly dental restoration. This includes taking measures such as application of cold compresses to reduce swelling, and of course, contacting our office as soon as possible.

Temporary or Permanent Crown Came Off/Knocked Off

If there is no post in it, try to place it back on the tooth and bring it with you to your appointment if you cannot.

Broken, Knocked Out, Fractured, or Displaced Tooth

A broken, fractured or displaced tooth is usually not a cause for alarm, as long as decisive, quick action is taken.

If the tooth has been knocked out, try to place the tooth back in its socket while waiting to see your dentist.

First, rinse the mouth of any blood or other debris and place a cold cloth or compress on the check near the injury. This will keep down swelling.

If you cannot locate the tooth back in its socket, hold the dislocated tooth by the crown – not the root. Next, place it in a container of warm milk, saline or the victim’s own saliva and keep it in the solution until you arrive at the emergency room or dentist’s office.

For a fractured tooth, it is best to rinse with warm water and again, apply a cold pack or compress. Ibuprofen may be used to help keep down swelling.

If the tooth fracture is minor, the tooth can be sanded or if necessary, restored by the dentist if the pulp is not severely damaged.

If a child’s primary tooth has been loosened by an injury or an emerging permanent tooth, try getting the child to gently bite down on an apple or piece of caramel; in some cases, the tooth will easily separate from the gum.